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Jeff Thiel

Research Scientist/Engineer II

Email

jthiel@apl.uw.edu

Phone

206-221-4731

Education

B.S. Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound, Seattle University, 1992

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Application of a novel burst wave lithotripsy and ultrasonic propulsion technology for the treatment of ureteral calculi in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and renal calculi in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina)

Holmes, A.E., and 17 others including J. Thiel and M.R. Bailey, "Application of a novel burst wave lithotripsy and ultrasonic propulsion technology for the treatment of ureteral calculi in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and renal calculi in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina)," Urolithiasis, 52, doi:10.1007/s00240-023-01515-6, 2024.

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8 Jan 2024

Marine mammals may develop kidney stones, which can be challenging to treat. We describe burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) and ultrasonic propulsion to treat ureteral calculi in a 48-year-old female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and to reduce renal stone burden in a 23-year-old male harbor seal (Phoca vitulina). BWL and ultrasonic propulsion were delivered transcutaneously in sinusoidal ultrasound bursts to fragment and reposition stones. Targeting and monitoring were performed with real-time imaging integrated within the BWL system. Four dolphin stones were obtained and fragmented ex vivo. The dolphin case received a 10-min and a 20-min BWL treatment conducted approximately 24 h apart to treat two 8–10 mm partially obstructing right mid-ureteral stones, using oral sedation alone. For the harbor seal, while under general anesthesia, retrograde ureteroscopy attempts were unsuccessful because of ureteral tortuosity, and a 30-min BWL treatment was targeted on one 10-mm right kidney stone cluster. All 4 stones fragmented completely to < 2-mm fragments in < 20 min ex vivo. In the dolphin case, the ureteral stones appeared to fragment, spread apart, and move with ultrasonic propulsion. On post-treatment day 1, the ureteral calculi fragments shifted caudally reaching the ureteral orifice on day 9. On day 10, the calculi fragments passed, and the hydroureter resolved. In the harbor seal, the stone cluster was observed to fragment and was not visible on the post-operative computed tomography scan. The seal had gross hematuria and a day of behavior indicating stone passage but overall, an uneventful recovery. BWL and ultrasonic propulsion successfully relieved ureteral stone obstruction in a geriatric dolphin and reduced renal stone burden in a geriatric harbor seal.

Tissue properties and respiratory kinematics of the tongue base and soft palate in the obese OSA minipig

Leotta, D.F., D. Ly, G. Galil, J. Thiel, E. Willis, N. Balu, and Z.-J. Liu, "Tissue properties and respiratory kinematics of the tongue base and soft palate in the obese OSA minipig," Plos One, 18, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0293907, 2023.

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7 Dec 2023

Obesity is a common finding and a major pathogenetic factor in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults. To understand the mechanisms behind this, the present study investigated the tissue properties and respiratory kinematics of the tongue base and soft palate in the obese OSA minipig model. In 4 verified obese/OSA and 3 non-obese/non-OSA control minipigs, MRI fat-weighted images, ultrasound elastography (USE), and sleep video-fluoroscopy (SVF) were performed to quantify the fat composition, tissue stiffness, and respiratory kinematics of the tongue base and soft palate during sedated sleep. The results indicated that the fat composition gradually increased from the rostral to caudal tongue base, particularly in the posterior 1/3 of the tongue base, regardless of the presence of obesity and OSA. However, this trend was not seen in the soft palate and pharyngeal wall. The pharyngeal wall presented the highest fat composition as compared with the tongue base and soft palate. Overall, obese OSA minipigs showed stiffer tongue tissue than the controls, particularly in the rostral region of the tongue in obese Yucatan minipigs. The respiratory moving ranges of the soft palate were greater in both dorsal-ventral and rostral-caudal directions and during both respiratory and expiratory phases in OSA obese than control minipigs, and the largest moving ranges were seen in OSA obese Panepinto minipigs. The moving range of the tongue base was significantly smaller. These results suggest more fat infiltration in the caudal region of the tongue base regardless of the presence of obesity and/or OSA. The greater tissue stiffness of the tongue in obese OSA minipigs may result from altered neuromuscular drive.

Development of an automated ultrasound signal indicator of lung interstitial syndrome

Khokhlova, T.D., G.P. Thomas, J. Hall, K. Steinbock, J. Thiel, B.W. Cunitz, M.R. Bailey, L. Anderson, R. Kessler, M.K. Hall, and A.A. Adedipe, "Development of an automated ultrasound signal indicator of lung interstitial syndrome," J. Ultrasound Med., EOR, doi:10.1002/jum.16383, 2023.

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5 Dec 2023

The number and distribution of lung ultrasound (LUS) imaging artifacts termed B-lines correlate with the presence of acute lung disease such as infection, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and pulmonary edema. Detection and interpretation of B-lines require dedicated training and is machine and operator-dependent. The goal of this study was to identify radio frequency (RF) signal features associated with B-lines in a cohort of patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema. A quantitative signal indicator could then be used in a single-element, non-imaging, wearable, automated lung ultrasound sensor (LUSS) for continuous hands-free monitoring of lung fluid.

More Publications

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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