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Amy Sprenger

Engineer III

Email

asprenger@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-543-0061

Education

B.S. Biology, Boston College, 1997

M.S. Natural Science/Science Education, Huxley College, Western Washington University, 2007

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Environmental correlates of growth and stable isotopes in intertidal species along an estuarine Fjord

Ruesink, J.L., A.C. Trimble, H. Berry, A.G. Sprenger, and M.N. Dethier, "Environmental correlates of growth and stable isotopes in intertidal species along an estuarine Fjord," Estuar. Coasts, 37, 149-159, doi:10.1007/s12237-013-9645-9, 2014.

More Info

1 Jan 2014

Production and resource use by intertidal taxa were studied in the estuarine fjord of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Along nearly 100 km, salinity is similar, and intertidal habitat and immersion time were kept consistent, thus allowing a focus on other environmental variables such as temperature and resource availability that could influence growth. Primary producers (ulvoid and fucoid macroalgae) and suspension feeders (oysters and barnacles) were transplanted on three beaches in each of three regions and assessed for individual-level growth, carbon and nitrogen ratios, and stable isotopes. In most transplants, δ13C and C/N showed no regional variation but δ15N was enriched up-estuary. Among environmental variables, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids, and particulate organic matter had small and/or inconsistent regional variation, but temperature was higher up-estuary. For the most intensively studied species (Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas) transplanted four times over 2 years, seasonal and regional variation in growth were best predicted by temperature rather than resource availability. Growth rates continued to increase into Totten Inlet, a shallow finger inlet at the head of Puget Sound. As indicators of environmental conditions, the growth and tissue chemistry of intertidal study taxa affirm that sources and amounts of resources show no strong gradients along this estuarine fjord, and they also support temperature as a key factor for performance, with species-specific responses. Higher temperatures may also have community-level impacts, given prior evidence linking beach temperatures to reduced intertidal diversity and biomass into Puget Sound.

Environmental correlate of growth and stable isotopes in intertidal species along an estuarine fjord

Ruesink, J.L., A.C. Trimble, H. Berry, A.G. Sprenger, and M.N. Dethier, "Environmental correlate of growth and stable isotopes in intertidal species along an estuarine fjord," Estuar. Coast., 37, 149-159, doi:10.1007/s12237-013-9645-9, 2013.

More Info

1 Jun 2013

Production and resource use by intertidal taxa were studied in the estuarine fjord of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Along nearly 100 km, salinity is similar, and intertidal habitat and immersion time were kept consistent, thus allowing a focus on other environmental variables such as temperature and resource availability that could influence growth. Primary producers (ulvoid and fucoid macroalgae) and suspension feeders (oysters and barnacles) were transplanted on three beaches in each of three regions and assessed for individual-level growth, carbon and nitrogen ratios, and stable isotopes. In most transplants, δ13C and C/N showed no regional variation but δ15N was enriched up-estuary. Among environmental variables, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids, and particulate organic matter had small and/or inconsistent regional variation, but temperature was higher up-estuary. For the most intensively studied species (Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas) transplanted four times over 2 years, seasonal and regional variation in growth were best predicted by temperature rather than resource availability. Growth rates continued to increase into Totten Inlet, a shallow finger inlet at the head of Puget Sound. As indicators of environmental conditions, the growth and tissue chemistry of intertidal study taxa affirm that sources and amounts of resources show no strong gradients along this estuarine fjord, and they also support temperature as a key factor for performance, with species-specific responses. Higher temperatures may also have community-level impacts, given prior evidence linking beach temperatures to reduced intertidal diversity and biomass into Puget Sound.

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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