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Beth Curry

Research Associate

Email

bethc@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-685-8326

Education

Ph.D. Physical Oceanography, University of Washington, 2013

M.S. Physical Oceanography, University of Washington, 2009

B.S. Civil Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2002

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Studies of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago water transport and its relationship to basin-local forcing: Results from AO-FVCOM

Zhang, Y., C. Chen, R.C. Beardsley, G. Gao, Z. Lai, B. Curry, C.M. Lee, H. Lin, J. Qi, and Q. Xu, "Studies of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago water transport and its relationship to basin-local forcing: Results from AO-FVCOM," J. Geophys. Res., 121, 4392-4415, doi:10.1002/2016JC011634, 2016.

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1 Jun 2016

A high-resolution (up to 2 km), unstructured-grid, fully coupled Arctic sea ice-ocean Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (AO-FVCOM) was employed to simulate the flow and transport through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) over the period 1978–2013. The model-simulated CAA outflow flux was in reasonable agreement with the flux estimated based on measurements across Davis Strait, Nares Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Jones Sounds. The model was capable of reproducing the observed interannual variability in Davis Strait and Lancaster Sound. The simulated CAA outflow transport was highly correlated with the along-strait and cross-strait sea surface height (SSH) difference. Compared with the wind forcing, the sea level pressure (SLP) played a dominant role in establishing the SSH difference and the correlation of the CAA outflow with the cross-strait SSH difference can be explained by a simple geostrophic balance. The change in the simulated CAA outflow transport through Davis Strait showed a negative correlation with the net flux through Fram Strait. This correlation was related to the variation of the spatial distribution and intensity of the slope current over the Beaufort Sea and Greenland shelves. The different basin-scale surface forcings can increase the model uncertainty in the CAA outflow flux up to 15%. The daily adjustment of the model elevation to the satellite-derived SSH in the North Atlantic region outside Fram Strait could produce a larger North Atlantic inflow through west Svalbard and weaken the outflow from the Arctic Ocean through east Greenland.

An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part III: Hydrography and fluxes

Ilicak, M., and 37 others, including B. Curry and C. Lee, "An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part III: Hydrography and fluxes," Ocean Model., 100, 141-161, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2016.02.004, 2016.

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1 Apr 2016

Highlights

We compare the simulated Arctic Ocean in 15 global ocean–sea ice models.
There is a large spread in temperature bias in the Arctic Ocean between the models.
Warm bias models have a strong temperature anomaly of inflow of Atlantic Water.
Dense outflows formed on Arctic shelves are not captured accurately in the models.

An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part I: Sea ice and solid freshwater

Wang, Q., and 38 others, including B. Curry and C. Lee, "An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part I: Sea ice and solid freshwater," Ocean Model., 99, 110-132, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2015.12.008, 2016.

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1 Mar 2016

Highlights

Arctic sea ice extent and solid freshwater in 14 CORE-II models are inter-compared.
The models better represent the variability than the mean state.
The September ice extent trend is reasonably represented by the model ensemble mean.
The descending trend of ice thickness is underestimated compared to observations.
The models underestimate the reduction in solid freshwater content in recent years.

More Publications

An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part II: Liquid freshwater

Wang, Q., and 38 others., including B. Curry and C. Lee, "An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part II: Liquid freshwater," Ocean Model., 99, 86-109, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2015.12.009, 2016.

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1 Mar 2016

Highlights

Arctic liquid freshwater budget simulated in 14 CORE-II models is studied.
The models better represent the temporal variability than the mean state.
Multi-model mean (MMM) FW fluxes compare well with observations.
MMM FWC shows an upward trend in the recent years, with an underestimated rate.
FW flux interannual variability is more consistent where volume flux determines it.

Greenland freshwater pathways in the sub-Arctic seas from model experiments with passive tracers

Dukhovskoy, D.S., P.G. Myers, G. Platov, M.-L. Timmermans, B. Curry, A. Proshutinsky,
J.L. Bamber, E. Chassignet, X. Hu, C.M. Lee, and R. Somavilla, "Greenland freshwater pathways in the sub-Arctic seas from model experiments with passive tracers," J. Geophys. Res., 121, 877-907, doi:10.1002/2015JC011290, 2016.

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26 Jan 2016

Accelerating since the early 1990s, the Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss exerts a significant impact on thermohaline processes in the sub-Arctic seas. Surplus freshwater discharge from Greenland since the 1990s, comparable in volume to the amount of freshwater present during the Great Salinity Anomaly events, could spread and accumulate in the sub-Arctic seas, influencing convective processes there. However, hydrographic observations in the Labrador Sea and the Nordic Seas, where the Greenland freshening signal might be expected to propagate, do not show a persistent freshening in the upper ocean during last two decades. This raises the question of where the surplus Greenland freshwater has propagated. In order to investigate the fate, pathways, and propagation rate of Greenland meltwater in the sub-Arctic seas, several numerical experiments using a passive tracer to track the spreading of Greenland freshwater have been conducted as a part of the Forum for Arctic Ocean Modeling and Observational Synthesis effort. The models show that Greenland freshwater propagates and accumulates in the sub-Arctic seas, although the models disagree on the amount of tracer propagation into the convective regions. Results highlight the differences in simulated physical mechanisms at play in different models and underscore the continued importance of intercomparison studies. It is estimated that surplus Greenland freshwater flux should have caused a salinity decrease by 0.06–0.08 in the sub-Arctic seas in contradiction with the recently observed salinification (by 0.15–0.2) in the region. It is surmised that the increasing salinity of Atlantic Water has obscured the freshening signal.

Outside influences on the water column of Cumberland Sound, Baffin Island

Bedard, J.M. S. Vagle, J.M. Klymak, W.J. Williams, B. Curry, and C.M. Lee, "Outside influences on the water column of Cumberland Sound, Baffin Island," J. Geophys. Res., 120, 5000-5018, doi:10.1002/2015JC010811, 2015.

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1 Jul 2015

Cumberland Sound, host to a commercially viable fish population in the deepest depths, is a large embayment on the southeast coast of Baffin Island that opens to Davis Strait. Conductivity, temperature, and depth profiles were collected during three summer field seasons (2011–2013), and two moorings were deployed during 2011–2012. Within the sound, salinity increases with increasing depth while water temperature cools reaching a minimum of -1.49°C at roughly 100 m. Below 100 m, the water becomes both warmer and saltier. Temperature-salinity curves for each year followed a similar pattern, but the entire water column in Cumberland Sound cooled from 2011 to 2012, and then warmed through the summer of 2013. Even though the sound's maximum depth is over a kilometer deeper than its sill, water in the entire sound is well oxygenated. A comparison of water masses within the sound and in Davis Strait shows that, above the sill, the sound is flooded with cold Baffin Island Current water following an intermittent geostrophic flow pattern entering the sound along the north coast and leaving along the south. Below the sill, replenishment is infrequent and includes water from both the Baffin Island Current and the West Greenland Current. Deep water replenishment occurred more frequently on spring tides, especially in the fall of 2011. Although the sound's circulation is controlled by outside currents, internal water modifying processes occur such as estuarine flow and wind-driven mixing.

Multi-year volume, liquid freshwater, and sea ice transports through Davis Strait, 2004–2010

Curry, B., C.M. Lee, B. Petrie, R.E. Moritz, and R. Kwok, "Multi-year volume, liquid freshwater, and sea ice transports through Davis Strait, 2004–2010," J. Phys. Oceanogr., 44, 1244-1266, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-13-0177.1, 2013.

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1 Apr 2014

Davis Strait is a primary gateway for freshwater exchange between the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans including freshwater contributions from West Greenland and Canadian Arctic Archipelago glacial melt. Data from six years (2004–2010) of continuous measurements collected by a full-strait moored array and concurrent high-resolution Seaglider surveys are used to estimate volume and liquid freshwater transports through Davis Strait, with respective annual averages of –1.6 ± 0.5 Sv and –93 ± 6 mSv (negative sign indicates southward transport). Sea ice export contributes an additional 10 ± 1 mSv of freshwater transport, estimated using satellite ice area transport and moored upward-looking sonar ice thickness measurements. Interannual and annual variability of the net transports are large, with average annual volume and liquid freshwater transport standard deviations of 0.7 Sv and 17 mSv and with interannual standard deviations of 0.3 Sv and 15 mSv. Moreover, there are no clear trends in the net transports over the 6-yr period. However, salinity in the upper 250 m between Baffin Island and mid-strait decreases starting in September 2009, remains below average through August 2010, but appears to return to normal by the end of 2010. This freshening event, likely caused by changes in Arctic freshwater storage, is not apparent in the liquid freshwater transport time series due to a reduction in southward volume transport in 2009–2010. Reanalysis of Davis Strait mooring data from the period 1987–1990, compared to the 2004–2010 measurements, reveals less Arctic outflow and warmer, more saline North Atlantic inflow during the most recent period.

Multiyear volume, liquid freshwater, and sea ice transports through Davis Strait, 2004–10

Curry, B., C.M. Lee, B. Petrie, R.E. Moritz, and R. Kwok, "Multiyear volume, liquid freshwater, and sea ice transports through Davis Strait, 2004–10," J. Phys. Oceanogr., 44, 1244-1266, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-13-0177.1, 2014.

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1 Apr 2014

Davis Strait is a primary gateway for freshwater exchange between the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans including freshwater contributions from west Greenland and Canadian Arctic Archipelago glacial melt. Data from six years (2004–10) of continuous measurements collected by a full-strait moored array and concurrent high-resolution Seaglider surveys are used to estimate volume and liquid freshwater transports through Davis Strait, with respective annual averages of –1.6 ± 0.5 Sverdrups (Sv; 1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) and –93 ± 6 mSv (negative sign indicates southward transport). Sea ice export contributes an additional –10 ± 1 mSv of freshwater transport, estimated using satellite ice area transport and moored upward-looking sonar ice thickness measurements. Interannual and annual variability of the net transports are large, with average annual volume and liquid freshwater transport standard deviations of 0.7 Sv and 17 mSv and with interannual standard deviations of 0.3 Sv and 15 mSv. Moreover, there are no clear trends in the net transports over the 6-yr period. However, salinity in the upper 250 m between Baffin Island and midstrait decreases starting in September 2009 and remains below average through August 2010, but appears to return to normal by the end of 2010. This freshening event, likely caused by changes in arctic freshwater storage, is not apparent in the liquid freshwater transport time series due to a reduction in southward volume transport in 2009–10. Reanalysis of Davis Strait mooring data from the period 1987–90, compared to the 2004–10 measurements, reveals less arctic outflow and warmer, more saline North Atlantic inflow during the most recent period.

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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