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Mike Boyd

Senior Principal Physicist

Email

mike@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-543-1391

Research Interests

Computer Simulation and Analysis

Biosketch

Michael Boyd has experience in environmental data extraction (inversion), acoustic modeling, and sonar performance prediction for both high frequency (topedo) and low frequency (ASW) systems. His current work includes using acoustic inversion techniques to extract environmental information and applying that information to tactical decision aids in use by the U.S. Navy.
He is also involved in the evaluation of sonar performance prediction models and has provided independent verification and validation of proposed Navy standard performance prediction models (CASTAR, ASPM, GRAB) for CNMOC. Mr. Boyd has been a member of the Laboratory since 1973.

Education

B.A. Mathematics and Physics, Austin College, 1967

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Corrections to A Geoactoustic Bottom Interaction Model (GABIM) [Jul 10 603-617]

Jackson, D.R., R.I. Odom, M.L. Boyd, and A.N. Ivakin, "Corrections to A Geoactoustic Bottom Interaction Model (GABIM) [Jul 10 603-617]," IEEE J. Ocean. Eng., 36, 373, doi:10.1109/JOE.2011.2117030, 2011.

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1 Apr 2011

This communication corrects errors and supplies missing parameter values for a previous publication by the authors (ibid., vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 603-617, Jul. 2010) regarding the geoacoustic bottom interaction model (GABIM).

A geoacoustic bottom interaction model (GABIM)

Jackson, D.R., R.I. Odom, M.L. Boyd, and A.N. Ivakin, "A geoacoustic bottom interaction model (GABIM)," IEEE J. Ocean. Eng., 35, 603-617, 2010.

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29 Jul 2010

The geoacoustic bottom interaction model (GABIM) has been developed for application over the low-frequency and midfrequency range (100 Hz to 10 kHz). It yields values for bottom backscattering strength and bottom loss for stratified seafloors. The model input parameters are first defined, after which the zeroth-order, nonrandom problem is discussed. Standard codes are used to obtain bottom loss, uncorrected for scattering, and as the first step in computation of scattering. The kernel for interface scattering employs a combination of the Kirchhoff approximation, first-order perturbation theory, and an empirical expression for very rough seafloors. The kernel for sediment volume scattering can be chosen as empirical or physical, the latter based on first-order perturbation theory. Examples are provided to illustrate the various scattering kernels and to show the behavior predicted by the full model for layered seafloors. Suggestions are made for improvements and generalizations of the model.

Using Seagliders for acoustic receiving and communication

Howe, B.M., and M.L. Boyd, "Using Seagliders for acoustic receiving and communication," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 123, 3913, 2008.

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1 May 2008

Underwater gliders are beginning to be used as tools in ocean acoustics and acoustical oceanography. Results from several experiments conducted in summer 2006 with Seagliders equipped with acoustic modems and receivers are described. Off Kauai, a glider received signals from the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate/North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory 75 Hz source; subsequent coherent processing showed close to theoretical gain for 12 min records while moving away from the source at ranges >100 km with velocity 20 cm/s (measured by travel time, Doppler, and dead reckoning). In the Monterey Bay MB06 experiment, two-way communications between other subsea platforms and shore via the acoustic modem-equipped glider was demonstrated (albeit with latency). The results support the future use of gliders as precision navigated platforms, communication and time distribution nodes, and thermometry/tomography mobile receivers.

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Including whale call detection in standard ocean measurements: Application of acoustic Seagliders

Moore, S.E., B.M. Howe, K.M. Stafford, and M.L. Boyd, "Including whale call detection in standard ocean measurements: Application of acoustic Seagliders," Mar. Tech. Soc. J., 41, 49-53, doi:10.4031/002533207787442033, 2007.

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1 Dec 2007

Over the past decade, fixed recorders have come into increasing use for long-term sampling of whale calls in remote ocean regions. Concurrently, the development of several types of autonomous underwater vehicles has demonstrated measurement capabilities that promise to revolutionize ocean science. These two lines of technical development were merged with the addition of broadband (5 Hz to 30 kHz) omni-directional hydrophones to seagliders. In August 2006, the capability of three Acoustic Seagliders (ASGs) to detect whale calls was tested in an experiment offshore Monterey, California. In total, 401 dives were completed and over 107 hours of acoustic data recorded. Blue whale calls were detected on all but two of the 76 dives where acoustic data were analyzed in detail, while humpback and sperm whale calls were detected on roughly 20% of those dives. Various whistles, clicks and burst calls, similar to those produced by dolphins and small whales, were also detected, suggesting that the capability of ASGs can be expanded to sample a broad range of marine mammal species. The potential to include whale call detection in the suite of standard oceanographic measures is unprecedented and provides a foundation for mobile sampling strategies at scales that better match the vertical and horizontal movements of the whales themselves. This capability opens new doors for investigation of cetacean habitats and their role in marine ecosystems, as envisioned in future ocean observing systems.

A smart sensor web for ocean observation: System design, architecture, and performance

Howe, B.M., P. Arabshahi, W.L.J. Fox, S. Roy, T. McGinnis, M.L. Boyd, A. Gray, and Y. Chao, "A smart sensor web for ocean observation: System design, architecture, and performance," Proc., NASA Science Technology Conference, 19-21 June, College Park, MD (2007).

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19 Jun 2007

Much of the cost and effort of new ocean observatories will be in the infrastructure that directly supports sensors, such as moorings and mobile platforms, which in turn connect to a "backbone" infrastructure. Four elements of this sensor network infrastructure are in various stages of development, presented here: (1) a cable-connected mooring system with a profiler under real-time control with inductive battery charging; (2) a glider with integrated acoustic communications and broadband receiving capability; (3) an integrated acoustic navigation and communication network with tomography on various scales; and (4) a satellite uplink and feedback system. We also present initial results from field experiments, as well as from studies on communication performance of the underwater sensor network system under development.

Sensor network infrastructure: moorings, mobile platforms, and integrated acoustics

Howe, B.M., T. McGinnis, and M.L. Boyd, "Sensor network infrastructure: moorings, mobile platforms, and integrated acoustics," International Symposium on Underwater Technology: International Workshop on Scientific Use of Submarine Cables and Related Technologies, 47-51 (IEEE, 2007).

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17 Apr 2007

Much of the cost and effort of new ocean observatories will be in the infrastructure that directly supports sensors, such as moorings and mobile platforms, which in turn connect to a "backbone" infrastructure, such as cabled seafloor nodes. Three elements of this sensor network infrastructure are in various stages of development: a cable-connected mooring system with a profiler under real-time control with inductive battery charging; a glider with integrated acoustic communications and broadband receiving capability; and integrated acoustic navigation, communications, and tomography, and ambient sound recording on various scales.

Sonar Environmental Parameter Estimation System (SEPES)

Anderson, G.M., R.T. Miyamoto, M.L. Boyd, and J.I. Olsonbaker, "Sonar Environmental Parameter Estimation System (SEPES)," APL-UW TR 0101, April 2002.

30 Apr 2002

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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